Mural, mural on the wall

The last three living members of the mural painting at the Hotel Seymour stand near their image on the wall. Pictured are Gerald Schaumberg, third from left in mural, Vikki Shellman, next to Schaumberg in mural, and Caroline Storma, seventh from left in mural. - Photo by Keith Skenandore

The last three living members of the mural painting at the Hotel Seymour stand near their image on the wall. Pictured are Gerald Schaumberg, third from left in mural, Vikki Shellman, next to Schaumberg in mural, and Caroline Storma, seventh from left in mural. – Photo by Keith Skenandore


The TV-hit comedy Cheers theme song “Where Everybody Knows Your Name,” by Gary Portnay seems so true at times when you think of certain bar establishments.
Cheers had Norm, Cliff and Frasier as every day bar patrons.
How about Gerald, Vikki and Caroline?
If you stop at the Hotel Seymour for some drinks and/or dinner you will see a mural depicting some of the regular customers that frequented that establishment.
Of the 16 patrons that are depicted in the mural, three remaining that are still alive gathered for a somewhat of a mural reunion on Wednesday, September 6, at the Hotel Seymour.
Gerald Schaumberg, 91, Caroline Storma, 89, and Vikki Shellman, 78, stood next to their caricature on the wall.
“It brings backs a lot of memories,” Storma said. “There were a lot of good times.”
She doesn’t recall how she was selected to be in the mural but she did say her husband Al “Stormy” Storma lived at the Hotel and that she was recruited.
“We spent a few times here at the bar,” she said laughingly.
The last time Caroline was at the Hotel Seymour was for her husband’s funeral dinner three years ago. She is still amazed how the mural looks.
“I still don’t think it is me,” Storma said.
Claude Peotter was the owner of the Hotel when the mural came about. The artist, Ole Olson, first did a pencil sketch of everyone then created the mural.
“Ole called me and asked me to be in the mural,” said Shellman.
She said it took about an hour for Olson to draw her then from there it was the final look on the wall.
“I think it’s neat that it’s still there,” Shellman said.
Shellman was told by Sue Jackson that the mural “will always be there.”
“That is great,” Shellman said.
Hotel Seymour owner Tom Jackson said when he took over the Hotel in 1994, he thought the mural was unique.
“When I found out that they were real people that were part of that then it was unique that no one else had,” Jackson said. “That was my first thought of it.”
Tom did some research and got some history back when Olson did the mural back in 1966.
“The people at that time that are on there were the regular customers that were pretty much the patronage at that time,” he said.
Jackson added that the mural was painted in the evenings when the bar was closed and that it was done on two pieces of plywood and there is no finish on the mural.
As for maintenance, Jackson said every now and then they wash it with water and some soap. It hasn’t been scrubbed or repainted.
The mural looks as good as new.
“We haven’t done anything to it,” he said, “for it being 50 years old.”
Jackson said it’s a piece of history of Seymour and also an iconic piece of history of Wisconsin and of the Hotel and what it was.
Jackson said he will never take the mural down but he does have a plan if he ever sells the business.
“I already have it if I ever do let go of the Hotel or sell it I’m going to have the people promise in writing to give it to the museum in town to put it up there if it is to come down,” Jackson said. “I’d like to see it donated to the museum to have someone take it down and preserve it. That’s where it’s going to go if it is ever does get taken down.”
The TV-hit comedy Cheers theme song “Where Everybody Knows Your Name,” by Gary Portnay seems so true at times when you think of certain bar establishments.
Cheers had Norm, Cliff and Frasier as every day bar patrons.
How about Gerald, Vikki and Caroline?
If you stop at the Hotel Seymour for some drinks and/or dinner you will see a mural depicting some of the regular customers that frequented that establishment.
Of the 16 patrons that are depicted in the mural, three remaining that are still alive gathered for a somewhat of a mural reunion on Wednesday, September 6, at the Hotel Seymour.
Gerald Schaumberg, 91, Caroline Storma, 89, and Vikki Shellman, 78, stood next to their caricature on the wall.
“It brings backs a lot of memories,” Storma said. “There were a lot of good times.”
She doesn’t recall how she was selected to be in the mural but she did say her husband Al “Stormy” Storma lived at the Hotel and that she was recruited.
“We spent a few times here at the bar,” she said laughingly.
The last time Caroline was at the Hotel Seymour was for her husband’s funeral dinner three years ago. She is still amazed how the mural looks.
“I still don’t think it is me,” Storma said.
Claude Peotter was the owner of the Hotel when the mural came about. The artist, Ole Olson, first did a pencil sketch of everyone then created the mural.
“Ole called me and asked me to be in the mural,” said Shellman.
She said it took about an hour for Olson to draw her then from there it was the final look on the wall.
“I think it’s neat that it’s still there,” Shellman said.
Shellman was told by Sue Jackson that the mural “will always be there.”
“That is great,” Shellman said.
Hotel Seymour owner Tom Jackson said when he took over the Hotel in 1994, he thought the mural was unique.
“When I found out that they were real people that were part of that then it was unique that no one else had,” Jackson said. “That was my first thought of it.”
Tom did some research and got some history back when Olson did the mural back in 1966.
“The people at that time that are on there were the regular customers that were pretty much the patronage at that time,” he said.
Jackson added that the mural was painted in the evenings when the bar was closed and that it was done on two pieces of plywood and there is no finish on the mural.
As for maintenance, Jackson said every now and then they wash it with water and some soap. It hasn’t been scrubbed or repainted.
The mural looks as good as new.
“We haven’t done anything to it,” he said, “for it being 50 years old.”
Jackson said it’s a piece of history of Seymour and also an iconic piece of history of Wisconsin and of the Hotel and what it was.
Jackson said he will never take the mural down but he does have a plan if he ever sells the business.
“I already have it if I ever do let go of the Hotel or sell it I’m going to have the people promise in writing to give it to the museum in town to put it up there if it is to come down,” Jackson said. “I’d like to see it donated to the museum to have someone take it down and preserve it. That’s where it’s going to go if it is ever does get taken down.”

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